Developers docs

Brief General Design Doc.
 

GUI usage

The GUI client is easy and intuitive to use. Just type in your search text in the search field like “funny*cats*.png”. You can use * symbol for any amount of omitted characters.

In menu “Filters” you can narrow search result by size, creation date, specific folder (including subfolders tree) and switch case sensitive search.
 

Indexer++ Filters Menu
 

You can search your files using a command-line as well. ifind (Indexer++ find) implements a subset of the options of the Linux find command, so for Linux users it is easy to start right away. For those, who are not familiar with find command here is options description with some examples:

ifind

Search a folder hierarchy for filename(s) that meet a desired criteria: Name, Size, File Type (see examples at the end of this section).

SYNTAX

ifind [path...] [expression]

OPTIONS

-help, --help
Print a summary of the command-line usage of ifind and exit.

TESTS

Numeric arguments can be specified as
+n for greater than n
-n for less than n
n for exactly n

-cmin n File was last created n minutes ago.

-ctime n File was last created n*24 hours ago. When find figures out how many 24-hour periods ago the file was created, any fractional part is ignored.

+7 = more than 7 days ago
2 = between 2 and 3 days ago
-2 = within the past 2 days
+1 = more than 1 day old
1 = between 1 and 2 days ago
-1 = within the past 1 day 
0 = within the past 1 day

To match a date range you can specify more than one test.

-amin n File was last accessed n minutes ago.

-atime n File was last accessed n*24 hours ago. When find figures out how many 24-hour periods ago the file was last accessed, any fractional part is ignored.

-mmin n File’s data was last modified n minutes ago. e.g. find . -mmin +5 -mmin -10 # find files modifed between 5 and 10 minutes ago

-mtime n File’s data was last modified n*24 hours ago. See the comments for -atime to understand how rounding affects the interpretation of file modification times.

-name pattern
Base of file name (the path with the leading directories removed) matches pattern.

-iname pattern Like -name, but the match is case insensitive. For example, the patterns ‘fo*’ and ‘F??’ match the file names ‘Foo’, ‘FOO’, ‘foo’, ‘fOo’, etc.

-size n[cwbkMG] File uses n units of space. The following suffixes can be used:

‘c’ or ‘B’ for bytes
‘k’ or ‘KB’ for Kilobytes (units of 1024 bytes)
‘M’ or ‘MB’ for Megabytes (units of 1048576 bytes)
‘G’ or ‘GB’ for Gigabytes (units of 1073741824 bytes)

-type d File is of type d:
d directory
f regular file

ACTIONS

-fprint filename
Print the full file name into file filename. If file does not exist when find is run, it is created; if it does exist, it is truncated.

-fprintf filename format
Print format into file filename, interpreting ‘\’ escapes and ‘%’ directives.

Maximum number of files that would be displayed in console is 50. Use -fprint or -fprintf for bigger results set.

The escapes and directives are:

\a Alarm bell.
\b Backspace.
\f Form feed.
\n Newline.
\r Carriage return.
\t Horizontal tab.
\v Vertical tab.
\\ A literal backslash (‘\’).
A ‘\’ character followed by any other character is treated as an ordinary character, so they both are printed.
%% A literal percent sign.
%a File’s last access time in the current locale format.
%t File’s last modification time in the current locale format.
%Ak File’s last access time in the format specified by k, which is either ‘@’ or a directive for the C ‘wcsftime’ function.
%Tk File’s last modification time in the format specified by k, which is the same as for %A.
For creation and modification time use c, C and m, M correspondingly.

The possible values for k are listed below:

Time fields:
@ seconds since January 1, 1601, 00:00.
H hour (00..23)
I hour (01..12)
M minute (00..59)
S second (00..61)
p locale's AM or PM
X locale's time representation (H:M:S)
Z time zone (e.g., EDT), or nothing if no time zone is determinable
Date fields:
a locale's abbreviated weekday name (Sun..Sat)
A locale's full weekday name, variable length (Sunday..Saturday)
b locale's abbreviated month name (Jan..Dec)
B locale's full month name, variable length (January..December)
c locale's date and time (Sat Nov 04 12:02:33 EST 1989)
d day of month (01..31)
j day of year (001..366)
m month (01..12)
U week number of year with Sunday as first day of week (00..53)
w day of week (0..6)
W week number of year with Monday as first day of week (00..53)
x locale's date representation (mm/dd/yy)
y last two digits of year (00..99)
Y year (1970...)
Other:
%h Leading directories of file's name (all but the last element).
%p File's name.
%s File's size in bytes.
A '%' character followed by any other character is discarded (but the other character is printed).

Examples

List filenames ending in .mp3, searching in the current folder and all subfolders:
$ ifind . -name "*.mp3"

List filenames ending in .mp3, searching in all filesystem NTFS drives, their folders and all subfolders:
$ ifind / -name "*.mp3"

List filenames matching the name Alice or ALICE (case insensitive), search in the current folder (.) and all subfolders:
$ ifind . -iname "alice"

List filenames ending in .mp3, searching in the music folder and subfolders:
$ ifind ./music -name "*.mp3"

List files with the exact name: Sales_document.doc in ./work and subfolders:
$ ifind ./work -name Sales_document.doc

List all the directory and sub-directory names:
$ ifind . -type d

List all files in those sub-directories (but not the directory names):
$ ifind . -type f

ifind files that are over a gigabyte in size:
$ ifind ~/Movies -size +1024M

Find files that are over 1 GB but less than 20 GB in size:
$ ifind ~/Movies -size +1024M -size -20480M -print0

Find files have been modified within the last day:
$ ifind ~/Movies -mtime -1

Find files which have been modified in the last twenty-four hours:
$ ifind ~/Movies -mtime 0

Find files have been modified within the last 30 minutes:
$ ifind ~/Movies -mmin -30

Find .doc files that also start with ‘questionnaire’ (AND):
$ ifind . -name 'questionnaire*.doc'

ifind Documentation